Graduate Student Handbook

LINGUISTICS GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 2016-2017
 

PDF Version

 

Last Revised 8/29/2016
 

WELCOME

DEPARTMENTAL MISSION STATEMENT

 

DEPARTMENTAL OFFICERS AND STAFF

 

PART I:   DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC GUIDELINES

 

1. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

1.1 Requirement for the Master of Arts in Linguistics with a Concentration in Language and Communication (MLC)

1.2 Requirements for the Master of Science (M.S.)

1.3 Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

1.3.1 Coursework

1.3.2 Foreign Language Proficiency

1.3.3 Research Tool Proficiency

1.3.4 Qualifying Review and First Qualifying Paper (QP1)

1.3.5 The Second Qualifying Paper (QP2)

1.3.6 Ph.D. Oral Examination.

1.3.7 Dissertation Proposal

1.3.8 Dissertation Defense

 

2. FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

 

3. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS

 

4. CONSORTIUM COURSES

 

5. GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS.

5.1 Advising

5.2 Enrollment

5.3 Registration, leaves of absence and extensions

5.4 Thesis Research and Continuous Registration

5.5 Transfer of credit

5.6 Intensive coursework

5.7 Turn-around time

5.8 Deadlines

5.9 Incompletes and non-recorded grades

5.10 Academic Integrity and Academic Misconduct

5.11 Undergraduate Tutorial

5.12 Appeals

5.13 Institutional Review Board (IRB) and Protection of Minors Policy

5.14 Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT)

5.15 Language Scholarships

5.16 Accelerated Master’s Degrees

 

PART II:  CONCENTRATION-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

 

1.  THE CONCENTRATION IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS

1.1 M.S. in Applied Linguistics

1.2 Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics

 

2.THE CONCENTRATION IN COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS

2.1 M.S. in Computational Linguistics

2.2 Ph.D. in Computational Linguistics

 

3. THE CONCENTRATION IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS

3.1 M.S. in Sociolinguistics

3.2 M.A. in Linguistics with a Concentration in Language and Communication (MLC)

3.3 Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics

 

4. THE CONCENTRATION IN THEORETICAL LINGUISTICS

4.1 M.S. with a concentration in Theoretical Linguistics

4.2 Ph.D. with a concentration in Theoretical Linguistics

 

5. GENERAL LINGUISTICS.

PART III:  LIFE IN THE LINGUISTICS DEPARTMENT.

 

1. FINANCIAL SUPPORT

 

2. LINGUISTICS TEACHING PRACTICUM (LING 501 & LING 502)

 

3. COMMUNICATION

3.1 Mailboxes

3.2 E-mail and Computing Facilities

3.3 GULINGUIST

3.4 Website

 

4. GETTING INVOLVED

4.1 Georgetown Linguistics Student Association (GLSA) and Graduate Student Organization (GSO)

4.2 Georgetown Undergraduate Linguistics Society (GULS)

4.3 Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL)

4.4 Georgetown University Working Papers in Theoretical Linguistics (GUWPTL)

4.5 Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (GURT)

 

5. UNIVERSITY SUPPORT RESOURCES

 

6. LINGUISTICS LABS

 

PART IV: THE FACULTY

 

PART V: PLAN OF STUDY FORMS

 


WELCOME

Welcome to the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University.  This guidebook was created to provide you with important information concerning academic regulations and graduate student life.  Please read it carefully.

The School of Languages and Linguistics, including the Linguistics Faculty, was first established at Georgetown University in 1949.  The Department of Linguistics, now part of the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics in Georgetown College, came into being in 1972.  Today, the Department is made up of 18 core faculty members, 15 affiliated faculty members, and approximately 100 undergraduate and 105 graduate students whose research interests span a broad range of approaches to the study of language.  Students may concentrate in Applied Linguistics, Computational Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, or Theoretical Linguistics, and they may pursue studies which combine or cross these concentrations.

The information presented in this guidebook should be regarded as representing general guidelines that are not binding on the Department or on Georgetown University.  As in any vital and growing department, policies may change to reflect changing needs and goals.  Specific requirements set forth in this handbook apply to students entering in the Fall of 2016.  Students who joined the Department prior to Fall 2016 may be subject to different requirements and should consult the guidebook which was current when they were admitted, as well as their advisors.

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences establishes minimum requirements for admission and the award of degrees. Students should familiarize themselves with all the rules, regulations, and procedures relevant to their pursuit of a Graduate School degree.  The link to the current version of the Graduate Bulletin can be found at:  http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/

We trust that this guidebook will help make your graduate career at Georgetown a successful one.

                                Donna Lardiere, Ph.D.
                                Director of Graduate Studies


Departmental Mission Statement

The Linguistics Department at Georgetown is committed to analyzing a diversity of linguistics phenomena through different modes of inquiry.  Our view of language as a cultural, social and psychological phenomenon leads us to examine the dialectic between what is universal and what is particular and unique across languages.  We do so through analyses of the structure of language, the acquisition of language, the use of language in context, and computational models of language.  Our course curriculum, departmental areas of research, and individual research interests allow us to incorporate a wide range of modes of inquiry, including those drawn from the Humanities, Social Sciences, Logic and Mathematics, and Natural Sciences.  By valuing the legitimacy and relevance of research at every level of analysis, and acknowledging that no one model of language can provide all the answers (or even address all the pertinent questions), we provide a foundation for a Ph.D. in a Department that is built upon a tradition of unique pluralism.


Department Officers and Staff, 2016-2017
Department Chair Elizabeth Zsiga, Ph.D. Contact
Vice-Chair Alison Mackey, Ph.D. Contact
Director of Undergraduate Studies Cynthia Gordon, Ph.D. Contact
Director of Graduate Studies Donna Lardiere, Ph.D. Contact
Concentration heads    
    Applied Linguistics Alison Mackey, Ph.D. Contact
    Computational Linguistics Amir Zeldes, Ph.D. Contact
    Sociolinguistics Natalie Schilling, Ph.D. Contact
    Theoretical Linguistics Ruth Kramer, Ph.D. Contact
     
     
Director, MLC Program Anastasia Nylund, Ph.D.

Contact

Department Administrator Conor Sinclair, M.A. Contact
Graduate Program Coordinator Erin Esch Pereira Contact
Administrative Assistant Jennifer Brusstar Contact
Business Manager Cristian Desmaras Contact

 

Part I:    DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC GUIDELINES

1. Degree Requirements

The Department of Linguistics offers courses of study leading to a Master of Arts in Linguistics with a Concentration in Language and Communication (MLC) (1.1), Master of Science (M.S.) (1.2), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) (1.3).  The requirements for these degrees are outlined below.  Further details are given in Part II below.  It is the responsibility of students to know about and meet all degree requirements.

1.1 Requirement for the Master of Arts in Linguistics with a Concentration in Language and Communication (MLC)

The MLC prepares students to use linguistics, especially the areas of discourse analysis (including narrative analysis and cross cultural communication), Sociolinguistics, and pragmatics, in the workforce. The degree will prepare students to use their linguistics training in professional fields such as human resources, education, mediation and arbitration, technical and scientific writing, management, international communication, communication strategy, diversity training, counseling, consulting, advertising, marketing, branding, usability testing, public relations, and research (including media, public opinion, and non-profit research). The MLC also offers broad training in the analysis of language and communication, with a possible focus on language and health care, language and the law, or language and business.

The Graduate School allows three years from matriculation to complete all degree requirements and to graduate.  Students who enroll part-time may request an extension of time from the Graduate School to complete the degree.

Overall requirements: 8 courses (24 credits) plus a Master's Thesis, or 10 courses (30 credits).  (Note that students participating in the Accelerated Master's program may not choose the Thesis option.)

There is one required course (LING 487 Proseminar).  Other than this course there is flelibility in course requirements, and students will work with their faculty advisor to select courses that reflect their individual needs and interests (see Part II, Section 3.3.2. Students may opt to take some courses in other departments or schools within Georgetown, as well as courses at area universities (e.g. American, George Mason, George Washington) through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities (see Part I, Section 4, below).  Courses outside the department and/or outside Georgtown must be approved by the MLC Director.

To complete a Master’s Thesis, the student must be first approved by the MLC program the semester before beginning the thesis and then submit a proposal to their proposed mentor and to the Graduate School. If human subjects are involved, the Thesis requires IRB approval; see section 5.13.  Upon approval, the Master’s Thesis is deposited in the Graduate School.  See Section 1.2 below for further information on the Master's Thesis.

The MLC does not require students to demonstrate foreign language proficiency. 

1.2 Requirements for the Master of Science (M.S.)

The requirements for the Master of Science in Linguistics include coursework, foreign language proficiency, and a Master’s Research Paper. The Graduate School allows three years from matriculation to complete all degree requirements and to graduate.

Coursework
M.S. Students in concentrations other than Computational Linguistics are required to complete 36 hours of coursework. Of the total hours, 9 hours will consist of Departmental Core Courses in Sound, Form and Meaning (See Part I, Section 3). (Students in Computational Linguistics have different requirements. For details of the Computational Linguistics M.S., see Part II, Section 2.2.1.). Each concentration also requires courses within its own subject area: consult the descriptions provided in Part II of the handbook. The remaining credit hours are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the student’s faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses within the student’s concentration, courses in other concentrations, language courses, courses in other departments, and courses at area universities through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities (see Part I, Section 4).

Master’s students must maintain a grade point average of B (3.0) in order to remain in good standing in the program. Students who fail to maintain a B average will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Foreign Language Proficiency
All M.S. students are required to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language. Proficiency can be demonstrated in several ways, described in the departmental guidelines in Part I, Section 2.

Master’s Research Paper or Master’s Thesis
All M.S. students must write either a Master’s Research paper (MRP) or a Master’s Thesis. The two options are very similar; the MRP is the normal choice for M.S. students, but some choose to do a Thesis, which has more formal requirements for formatting and is deposited in the University Library. Students interested in doing a Thesis instead of an MRP should discuss the possibility with their advisor. (Note that computational students pursuing the 24 credit Master's program must do a Thesis, while students pursuing the 30 credit program may do a MRP or a Thesis.) Students must register for Thesis Research in order to write a Master’s Thesis.

An MRP or Thesis demonstrates students' ability to conduct and report original research in their area of concentration. The MRP/Thesis is written under the supervision of a Department faculty member selected by the student, who does not necessarily need to be the student’s faculty advisor. Early on in the semester in which the MRP/Thesis is due, the student must meet with the faculty member who will work with the student on the MRP/Thesis to discuss the requirements and to determine a schedule for submitting drafts. The MRP/Thesis should be 30 to 100 pages long and is usually written in the final semester of Master’s coursework. When the final draft is submitted to the DGS, a student must include a completed coversheet which is available on our website: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/forms. The MRP/Thesis must be formally approved by the Reader/Mentor and the Director of Graduate Studies.

An MRP is kept on file in the Linguistics Department, while a Thesis is filed with the Graduate School and kept in the University Library. If human subjects are involved, both the MRP and Master’s Thesis require IRB approval. See part 5.13 below for more information.

No oral defense of a Master's Thesis is required. One faculty member is required to serve as Thesis advisor/mentor, and no additional committee members are required; however, students may choose to ask additional faculty members to serve on their Thesis committees. Information about approval and submission of the final Thesis can be found here: http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/dissertation-thesis-information.

1.3 Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The requirements for the Ph.D. in Linguistics include:

  • coursework (1.3.1)
  • foreign language proficiency (1.3.2)
  • Research Tool proficiency (1.3.3)
  • Qualifying Review (1.3.4)
  • Second Qualifying Paper (QP2) (1.3.5)
  • Oral examination (1.3.6)
  • Dissertation proposal (1.3.7)
  • the writing and Oral Defense of a Dissertation (1.3.8)

Together with the faculty advisor, all doctoral students must complete a Plan of Study during the first semester in the doctoral program. This plan shall include the schedule for satisfying all degree requirements, including required courses, the Qualifying Review, the Second Qualifying Paper (QP2), the language requirements, and the Oral Examination. The Plan of Study must be approved by the student’s advisor during the first semester of coursework.

Doctoral students are allowed seven years from matriculation to complete all degree requirements and to graduate.
 

1.3.1 Coursework
A doctoral student in Linguistics is required to complete a total of 54 credits hours. These credit hours will include:

  • departmental distribution requirements (15 hours)
  • research tools courses (6 credits)
  • concentration courses
  • supplemental courses

Departmental distribution requirements

The courses that make up our distribution requirements reflect the diversity of perspectives on language and linguistics in our Department. Of the 18 courses (54 hours) required for completion of the Ph.D., 5 courses (15 hours) will come from the following content/skill areas:

  • Sound
  • Form
  • Meaning
  • Language Learning
  • Language Use

See Part I, Section 3 below for more details.

Research tools courses
Students in the Computational Linguistics, General Linguistics, Sociolinguistics and Theoretical Linguistics concentrations are required to take two courses which satisfy the “Research tool proficiency” requirement (Section 1.3.3 below). Students in the Applied Linguistics concentration are required to take three "Research tool proficiency" courses. These courses will often also be counted as concentration courses.

Concentration courses
Each concentration requires that a substantial portion of the 54 credit hours be within the concentration. Consult the descriptions in Part II of this handbook for concentration-specific requirements.

Supplemental courses
The remaining credit hours are taken as supplemental courses, selected with the guidance of the student’s faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses within the student’s concentration, courses in other concentrations, language courses, courses in other departments, and courses at area universities through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities (see Part I, Section 4).

Doctoral students must maintain a grade point average of B+ (3.3) in order to remain in good standing in the program. (Higher standards apply to holders of doctoral assistantships: see Part III, Section 1 below). Students who fail to maintain a B+ average will be placed on probation by the Department and given one semester to improve. If a student fails to improve sufficiently, he or she will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Waiving a Course Requirement
A student who wishes to waive a Georgetown linguistics course requirement based on previous academic work at the graduate level should fill out a student request form. The request must then be approved by their academic advisor, in consultation with the instructor of the course to be waived, and the Director of Graduate Studies. In general, at least 60% of the required course content should have been covered in the previous work, and the student will need to present evidence of this in the form of syllabi, reading lists, and possibly assignments. This careful evaluation is required to protect the student from being placed in upper level courses without the necessary preparation, as well as to uphold the department's goal of ensuring exposure to the diverse areas reflected in the distributional requirements. Please note that when a course is waived, the credits are not applied to the current degree program; the student must take another course to take the waived courses’ place in order to meet the required number of credit hours.

Advanced Standing (Ph.D. students only)
A Ph.D. student who has received a Master’s degree in Linguistics or a related field may reduce the number of credit hours required for the Ph.D. program by applying for advanced standing on the basis of previous coursework. Subject to Graduate School and Department approval, students with a Master’s degree in Linguistics may be granted up to 18 credits of advanced standing in the Ph.D. program.

Credit must have been earned in graduate level courses, at a fully accredited university, and with a grade of B or better. Courses which were taken more than seven years before entering our program will generally not be accepted for advanced standing. In order for a course to be considered for advanced standing, an official transcript showing the course must be on file with the Graduate School.

At the time the plan of study is submitted, a student who wishes to receive advanced standing must complete a student request form and obtain the signatures of the advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. Once the request for advanced standing is submitted, the Director of Graduate Studies will make a recommendation to the Graduate School, which is responsible for a final decision.

It is important to understand the difference between waiving a course and advanced standing. Waiving a course allows a student to satisfy a curricular requirement on the basis of previous
coursework, and doesn’t affect the number of credits in the student’s program. Advanced standing reduces the number of credits in the student’s program independently of satisfying any requirement. It is possible to apply for advanced standing, and to apply to waive a requirement, on the basis of the same previous course.
Students in the doctoral program who have not been granted any Advanced Standing have a 54-credit program.

1.3.2 Foreign Language Proficiency
Ph.D. students are required to have in-depth knowledge of a language other than their native language. Please refer to the Language Proficiency guidelines in Part 1, Section 2 for ways to satisfy this requirement. Students must satisfy the foreign language requirement before the Oral Examination (see Section 1.4.6) can be scheduled.

1.3.3 Research Tool Proficiency
Ph.D. students must also develop competence in tools of linguistic data collection and analysis. Ph.D. students concentrating in Computational Linguistics, General Linguistics, Sociolinguistics or Theoretical Linguistics must select 2 courses (6 credits) from among the following. Ph.D. students concentrating in Applied Linguistics must select 3 courses (9 credits). 

LING 362: Introduction to Natural Language Processing or
LING 367: Computational Corpus Linguistics
LING 404: Field Methods
LING 410 Phonetics
LING 495: Ethnography of Communication or
LING 571: Sociolinguistic Field Methods
LING 584: Statistics for Linguistic Research or
LING 681: Research Design and Methods
 

Students concentrating in Computational, General, Socio or Theoretical Linguistics may not choose:

               both LING 362: and LING 367,
               both LING 495 and LING 571,
               or
               both LING 584 and LING 681

as counting toward the fulfillment of the tools requirement.

Students concentrating in Applied Linguistics may not choose:

               both LING 362 and LING 367,
               or
               both LING 545 and LING 571,

in order to fulfill the tools requirement, but they must take: 

              both LING 584 and LING 681,

in addition to a third course from the list above.

Students should discuss with their advisors which research tool (s) are most appropriate for their program.

1.3.4 Qualifying Review and First Qualifying Paper (QP1)
In order to continue in the Ph.D. program, all doctoral students must pass a Qualifying Review no later than the fourth semester of enrollment. At this time students are required to have completed at least the Master level distribution requirements, but not necessarily all of the distribution requirements necessary for the Ph.D. degree. It is, however, highly recommended that students not leave the majority of the Ph.D. distribution requirements until the end of their coursework. Doing so could impede their ability to enroll in advanced courses and research seminars, both of which may have distribution requirements as their prerequisites. Students must assemble and submit to the Department a complete dossier by the appropriate deadline in either the spring or fall semester (see the ‘Graduate Student Deadlines calendar’ at: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/graduate-student-deadlines)

The dossier must contain the following materials:

1. A transcript of graduate coursework. Evidence of superior to excellent performance in Georgetown graduate linguistics courses is expected. A minimum overall grade point average of 3.3 (B+) is required. However the qualifying review committee will generally look for performance above the minimum. Grades of B or below in any course are a cause of concern.

2. Three letters of recommendation from Georgetown faculty. Recommenders will evaluate whether or not the applicant has shown superior to excellent performance in GU graduate courses and will estimate whether or not superior to excellent performance in completing the Ph.D. coursework and writing a successful dissertation in linguistics can be expected of the applicant. Recommenders also indicate on the evaluation form the degree to which they may be interested in serving on a given applicant’s dissertation committee; it may therefore be advisable for the applicant to take this interest level into account in selecting recommenders.

3. The First Qualifying Paper (QP1). The applicant must present a paper which provides evidence of superior to excellent ability to make and support relevant linguistic claims, demonstrating that the applicant is qualified to continue study toward a Ph.D. in the established concentration. The paper must present an analysis of some linguistic problem and must not be co-authored. Examples of papers that may be appropriate for submission include Master’s Research Papers or term papers from linguistics courses (revised if necessary). Each QP1 will be evaluated on:

  • how clearly it presents and motivates the research problem it addresses
  • how well it reviews prior literature
  • how well it motivates its methods and analytical framework
  • how well it motivates its claims

Note that, if human subjects are involved and the student may wish to use the research as part of a Masters Research Paper, Thesis, or dissertation, or in a presentation or publication, it is wise to seek IRB approval prior to conducting research for the QP1. See Section 5.13 for more details.

An applicant’s dossier will be evaluated by a committee composed of three faculty members. Members of the committee will rate the QP1 as Acceptable, Marginal or Unacceptable, will judge whether the applicant’s coursework, QP1 and letters of evaluation are superior to excellent, and will complete a Qualifying Examination Ballot for each applicant. Results will be reported to and reviewed by the Director of Graduate Studies, who will report the decision to the student and to the Graduate School. In cases where committee members are in disagreement, the Director of Graduate Studies may assign a fourth evaluator or return the file to an original committee member for reevaluation. If the committee’s decision is “Fail”, the Director of Graduate Studies will document the main reasons for the denial. In such cases, the student is not allowed to continue in the Ph.D. program, but may be awarded a terminal Master’s degree upon completing the Master’s requirements. Qualifying Review decisions are final.

If, in their course of the Ph.D. program, a doctoral student meets all of the requirements of a M.S. degree in Linguistics, he or she may apply to receive a “Master's in Passing”. This frequently happens around the time of the Qualifying Review, and with approval of the advisor and Director of Graduate Studies, the student may request to submit the QP1 as a Master’s Research Paper towards a Master’s in Passing. Note that the paper must meet all requirements of the Masters Research Paper, including IRB review if applicable; see Sections 1.4 and 5.13.

Please consult section IV.D.3 of the Graduate School Bulletin (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/) for full details about the “in passing” or “terminal” Master’s degree.

1.3.5 The Second Qualifying Paper (QP2)
In order to continue in the Ph.D. program, students must submit and receive a passing evaluation on the Second Qualifying Paper (QP2). This paper is to be submitted during the candidate’s final semester of doctoral coursework by the deadline posted in the Graduate Student Deadline calendar (https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/graduate-student-deadlines). The QP2 is typically written on a topic in the area of the student’s specialization and must not be co-authored. The QP2 will be evaluated by two faculty members appointed by the Director of Graduate Studies who have expertise in the subject area of the paper. The criterion will be that the paper be of publishable quality in an appropriate journal in the student’s concentration. The QP2 receives one of the following three evaluations, with the consequences outlined below regarding the student’s next steps:

1) Pass:Student organizes and prepares for the Ph.D. Oral Examination.
2) Revise:Student revises and resubmits a new version of the same paper.
3) Fail:Student is allowed to submit a new paper on a new topic.

In cases where the two evaluators are in disagreement, the Director of Graduate Studies may assign a third evaluator or return the file to an original evaluator for a reevaluation.

If the first submission of a QP2 is not passed, the second attempt (whether revision or entirely new) is due by the QP2 deadline set for the following semester. This second QP2 receives one of the following two evaluations, with the following consequences regarding the student’s next steps:

1) Pass:Student organizes and prepares for the Ph.D. oral Examination.
2) Fail:Student is not permitted to continue in the Ph.D. program.

Again, as above, in cases where evaluators are in disagreement, the Director of Graduate Studies may assign a third evaluator or return the file to an original evaluator for a reevaluation.

Note that, if human subjects are involved and the student may wish to use the research as part of a Masters Research Paper, Thesis, or dissertation, or in a presentation or publication, it is wise to seek IRB approval prior to conducting research for the QP2. See Section 5.13 for more details.

1.3.6 Ph.D. Oral Examination
During the semester following the completion of Ph.D. coursework, a doctoral candidate will prepare for and take the Oral Exam. In consultation with faculty, the student will determine which faculty member is best suited to direct the student’s dissertation (the mentor). In consultation with the mentor, the student will choose several topic areas relevant to the prospective dissertation research and will write a Problem Statement describing the issues and research to be addressed in the dissertation. The purpose of the Oral Exam is to test the student’s knowledge of these chosen topical areas and student's understanding of their roles in the student’s intended dissertation research. The Oral Examination will also include a discussion of the potential demands and impact on human subjects of the intended dissertation research.

The examination will be conducted by an examination committee consisting of the mentor (the committee chair) and two other faculty members from the Department of Linguistics or affiliated faculty. The examination is of two hours’ duration. Candidates will receive an evaluation of pass or fail. Upon the recommendation of the examining committee, a candidate who fails the Oral Exam for the first time is allowed to retake the examination once.

Each student is responsible for scheduling the Oral Examination and determining the availability of members of the committee at the scheduled date and time. At least two weeks before the examination date, the candidate must submit the Oral Examination scheduling form to the Graduate Program Coordinator. This form includes the names of the examination committee, their signatures approving the Problem Statement and areas of examination, and the date and time of the examination agreeable to the candidate and all committee members. On the scheduling form, the student may request any special audio-visual or other equipment needed for the exam.

1.3.7 Dissertation Proposal
After successful completion of the Oral Examination, the student will form a dissertation committee and submit a dissertation proposal. The mentor of the dissertation committee can be either a regular faculty member or an affiliated faculty member of the Department of Linguistics. If the mentor is not a regular faculty member of the Department of Linguistics, at least one of the other members of the committee must be a regular faculty member of the Department of Linguistics. If the student and mentor agree that it would be beneficial to include an individual who is not a Georgetown faculty member on the student’s committee, it is possible to request an outside reader, as long as he or she has a doctoral degree. This request must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. Once constituted, committee membership can only be changed only with departmental approval. To change the committee, the student must submit a change of committee form that needs to be approved by the new mentor, the removed committee member (if applicable) and the Director of Graduate Studies. While the Department does not routinely grant requests to change the committee, in cases of true incompatibility, a student may request that one—and usually only one – member of the committee be changed.

Students submit two versions of the proposal: a detailed version for approval by the committee and the Department, and an abbreviated version required by the Graduate School. The mentor will provide guidance as to what the detailed version should contain. The abbreviated version must be submitted using a form available from the Graduate School’s website (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/academic-forms/). Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval of the proposed study is a required element of all dissertation proposals involving human subjects; see Section 5.13 below.

The proposal is due to the mentor on the date indicated in the Graduate Student Deadline calendar; please consult https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/graduate-student-deadlines for exact deadlines. Several levels of review and approval are required; the following sequence is recommended:

1.a. Student submits the detailed version of the proposal for departmental (mentor, committee, and DGS) approval.
b. Simultaneous with 1a: Student applies for IRB-C approval (where required).
2.Student submits the Graduate School’s Dissertation proposal form to the Department for approval, and if it is acceptable, then it is filed with the Graduate School.

The Graduate School will not accept the filing of their proposal form concurrently with application for IRB-C approval. In the IRB Section of the Graduate School Proposal form you must write “approval pending” in such a case. No research, including pilot project research, even if approved by the Department and by the Graduate School, may be undertaken without the approval of the IRB-C concerning the use of human subjects. Prior IRB-C approval must be obtained for changes that materially affect human subjects. While departmental, IRB, and Graduate School approval are independent of one another, this suggested sequence generally minimizes the amount of proposal revision.

Approval of the proposal normally requires at least three weeks. After the proposal is approved, the student is expected to remain in touch with the (proposed) dissertation mentor on a regular basis (and at a minimum, once a semester) until the dissertation is successfully defended, even if the student is on leave of absence. The Department will not normally approve an extension of time to complete the degree if the dissertation proposal has not been approved, or if the student has not remained in consultation with the mentor.

1.3.8 Dissertation Defense
After the proposal has been approved, the candidate proceeds to dissertation research and writing under the guidance of the dissertation committee. The candidate is expected to check with the committee members to determine whether electronic copies or hard copies of dissertation drafts are preferred, and to have proofread the document before submitting it to committee members. When the dissertation committee agrees that the dissertation is substantially complete, the candidate will participate in a public Oral Defense of Thesis of approximately two hours’ duration. To schedule a defense a student must complete a Doctoral Dissertation Reviewers’ Report to be signed by each committee member at least two weeks before the defense. The Doctoral Dissertation Reviewers’ Report is a confirmation that the dissertation is defensible with no more than minor revisions. A full checklist of requirements is available here: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/forms

The Defense will be conducted by the dissertation committee and chaired by the dissertation mentor. Students should schedule the defense in consultation with their committee members. (Note: Faculty members are not obligated to schedule defenses or read drafts during the summer.) Immediately following the defense, the committee will discuss the results and recommend either pass or fail and this result will be posted to the student’s academic transcript. If the student has passed the defense he or she then will undertake any revisions required by the committee.

Once all required revisions have been completed and all committee members have approved the dissertation, the student then will submit the dissertation to the Director of Graduate Studies for final approval before submitting it to the Graduate School. Please allow the Director of Graduate Studies two weeks to approve the dissertation. For Graduate School dissertation submission deadlines please see: http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/dissertation-thesis-information. For the Graduate School's Guidelines for Dissertation and Thesis Writers, please see: https://georgetown.app.box.com/s/7azrk2jc6zntshvratzry9igh5hbopgp

Students must apply to graduate no later than the first day of the month in which they wish to graduate, with the exception of May which follows earlier deadlines. For more information about graduation see: http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/how-to-graduate.


2. Foreign Language Proficiency

All M.S. and Ph.D. students are required to have in-depth knowledge of a foreign language. (Students in the MLC program do not have a language requirement.) A foreign language is a language other than the student’s native language: Students whose native language is not English may present English as a foreign language.

Foreign language proficiency is required in linguistic research for either or both of the following two reasons:

  • As a medium: The language is needed so that the student can conduct teaching, research, or other professional activities using the language, or
  • For linguistic analysis: The language is needed so the student can carry out linguistic analysis using data from that language.

Many students will already have sufficient proficiency in a foreign language to satisfy the requirements before beginning their graduate program. If not, there are several ways to gain proficiency, and the way in which a student fulfills the language requirement depends on whether the language is needed mainly as a medium or mainly for linguistic analysis.

Students who need a foreign language for use as a medium can gain proficiency by taking a series of courses in that language. Intensive undergraduate courses may be used with departmental and Graduate School permission. Students must reach the Intermediate II level, and undergraduate courses used to fulfill the language requirement will not count towards the credits required of the graduate program. For more information about language study scholarships offered by the Graduate School, see Section 5.15 below.

Students can gain proficiency for purposes of linguistic analysis by taking one or more graduate courses on the structure of the language. Such courses must be passed with a grade of B+ or higher. It is also possible to develop the capacity to analyze a foreign language by successfully completing a suitable course such as LING 404 Field Methods. Students should discuss these options with their advisor and record the approved option on a student request form to be kept in the student’s Department file.

A student who has achieved proficiency in a foreign language may establish this in several ways:

(i) Students may take a proficiency test administered by someone who knows the language and also has knowledge of linguistics. Proficiency tests are offered regularly by the Georgetown language departments; consult the relevant Department for further information. Prior to the examination, the Graduate Program Coordinator should be notified by the student so that an exam ballot can be given to the professor administering the exam so that the results can be officially recorded on the student’s academic record. Exam ballots cannot be given to the student.

(ii) Students may formally request that a previous undergraduate major, minor or Master’s degree in a foreign language can be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement. The Director of Graduate Studies is responsible for approving or not approving such requests.

(iii) Students can demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by taking for credit a graduate Linguistics course conducted primarily in the language.

(iv) Students can request to satisfy the language requirement by writing a paper which analyzes an aspect of the language. The paper must be evaluated by a linguist familiar with the language and must constitute clear evidence that the student has sufficient command of the language for purposes of linguistic analysis. Typically such evidence would consist in the gathering of original data in the language, the use of the language in conducting research, or novel analysis of an extensive set of data.

(v) Non-native speakers of English may request that TOEFL or IELTS results presented as part of their application for admission be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement. The request must be made in writing on a student request form and be approved by the advisor and Director of Graduate Studies. Please attach a copy of the exam results. If you no longer have a copy of the results, you may request that the Graduate Program Coordinator obtain a copy from the Graduate School.

Students will submit a departmental request form (https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/forms) indicating how they will fulfill the requirement along with any supplemental documentation to demonstrate proficiency. The form must be signed by the academic advisor and submitted ot the Graduate Program Coordinator.

In order to have the satisfaction of the language requirement officially recorded, the Graduate Program Coordinator will obtain the signature of the appropriate faculty member (either the advisor or the linguist evaluating the student’s proficiency) on a completed language Exam Ballot.
Ph.D. students must satisfy the foreign language requirement before the Oral Exam can be scheduled. Master's students must satisfy the foreign language requirement in order to be cleared for graduation. We recommend submission of the request no later than March of the final semster in the program.


3. Departmental Distribution Requirements

All M.S. students are required to take the following three courses (9 credits):

  1. Sound
        LING 411: Phonology I
  2. Form
        LING 427: Generative Syntax I
       or
        LING 485: Cognitive Grammar
  3. Meaning
        LING 531: Semantics & Pragmatics I

Ph.D. students must take one course in each of Sound, Form, Meaning, Language Learning, and Language Use (a total of 15 credits).

  1. Sound
        LING 411: Phonology I
  2. Form
        Choose one of
        LING 427: Generative Syntax I
        or
        LING 485: Cognitive Grammar
  3. Meaning
        LING 531: Semantics & Pragmatics I
  4. Language Learning
        Choose one of
        LING 451: Language Acquisition
        or
        LING 553: Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism
  5. Language Use
        Choose one of
        LING 445: Language Contact
        LING 481: Sociolinguistic Variation
        LING 483: Discourse Analysis: Narrative
        LING 484: Discourse Analysis: Conversation

Ph.D. students should also keep in mind the need to satisfy the Research Tools proficiency requirement (Section 1.3.3 above).

In addition to these courses, incoming graduate students (except for MLC students) with no prior coursework in linguistics are strongly advised to take LING 401 General Linguistics or a similar ‘Introduction to Language’ or 'Introduction to Linguistics’ course during the summer prior to beginning their degree coursework. The credit hours for such a course do not count towards the M.S. or Ph.D. requirements. (MLC students may take LING 401 in the first semester of coursework, and the course will count toward the requirements for the MLC degree, see Part II Section 3.2 below.)

Students who have recently taken graduate-level courses in linguistics may apply to have one or more distribution requirements waived on the basis of this previous coursework (see Section 1.5.1. above).


4. Consortium Courses

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area was founded in 1964 to encourage cooperation and coordination among the following institutions:

American University
The Catholic University of America
Gallaudet University
George Mason University
The George Washington University
Georgetown University
Howard University
Marymount University
Mount Vernon College
Trinity College University of the District of Columbia
University of Maryland at College Park

As part of that effort, the Consortium has made it possible for students attending any one of these institution to take classes at another Consortium university through registration at their home university. For example, with faculty advisor approval, Georgetown students interested in American Sign Language may take courses at Gallaudet University and get credit at Georgetown; students interested in theoretical linguistics or first or second language acquisition can augment the selection of advanced courses at Georgetown with those offered at the University of Maryland at College Park. Consortium courses cannot be taken on an audit basis.

Consortium courses, courses taken through the Georgetown School of Continuing Studies as a non-degree seeking student, and courses taken as transfer credit cannot exceed 25% of the credits required for the degree (see section 5.5 below for more detail).

Consortium registration forms can be found in the Registrar’s Office. (A student cannot register for a Consortium course online through MyAccess.) The form must be signed and approved by the student’s advisor, the Dean and the Registrar’s Office. For complete instructions, go to the Georgetown Consortium Notes at: registrar.georgetown.edu/registration/consortium/.


5. General Academic Regulations

Please study the Graduate School Catalogue (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/), which is the authoritative source for general academic regulations, procedures and deadlines. It is the student’s responsibility to meet deadlines and to make sure that all degree requirements are met in a timely manner. Students should check the departmental (linguistics.georgetown.edu) and Graduate School (grad.georgetown.edu) websites regularly for notices. All linguistics students are subscribed to GULINGUIST, the Department e-mail list, to receive important information (see Part III, Section 3.3).

5.1 Advising

Each Linguistics graduate student is assigned a faculty advisor, who helps the student plan an academic program at Georgetown. The advisor must approve course selection at registration and pre-registration, and usually must sign any paperwork a student needs to complete. If a student finds another faculty member with whom he or she would rather work, and who is willing to serve as an advisor, such requests for changes will generally be honored. Requests for new advisors should be made to the Director of Graduate Studies via a student request form which can be obtained from the Graduate Program Coordinator or on our website (linguistics.georgetown.edu).

As a Ph.D. student is preparing to write a dissertation, he or she will choose a mentor who will provide research guidance and supervision. That mentor will be listed as the student’s faculty advisor. For a Master’s student, the reader of the Master’s Thesis, MRP, or Teaching Summative Portfolio does not necessarily become the student’s advisor unless requested, although it is typical that he or she does.

5.2 Enrollment

Registration in nine credits per semester is considered a full-time course load. It is recommended that graduate students in Linguistics be enrolled for at least 6 credits each semester until their coursework requirements are complete. Recipients of doctoral assistantships are required to be full-time students, and all doctoral students are advised to be full-time in order to complete their coursework requirements within three years. In addition, international students on a student visa must always be enrolled full-time; if for some reason an international student wishes to enroll in 6 or fewer credits, he or she must consult with the international student advisor and academic advisor to discuss whether this is consistent with visa requirements. No graduate student may enroll in more than 15 credits per semester. Note that scholarship funds provided by the Graduate School rarely cover more than 9 credits, and under no circumstances will they cover more than 12. Tuition scholarships are typically awarded for 3, 6, or 9 credits (or to cover Thesis Research after coursework is complete; see Section 5.4 below).

Linguistics graduate students do not have a pass/fail option for coursework taken in the Linguistics Department.

5.3 Registration, leaves of absence and extensions

Students must register or be on an approved leave of absence every semester from matriculation until all degree requirements have been completed. Each student is assigned an expected graduation date by the Graduate School; when this date is reached the student may not register again unless an extension of time to complete the degree is granted. Students who fail to register or receive approval for a leave of absence are withdrawn from their program by the Graduate School. Please consult sections II and VII of the Graduate School Bulletin (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/) for full details on registration requirements and full vs. part-time status.

During the course of a graduate student’s time at Georgetown, it may be necessary to take a leave of absence for personal or medical reasons.  The policies and procedures for this are found in the Graduate Bulletin, Section VII: Graduate Student Leave Policies (view/download the Graduate Bulletin from the top of the Policies page at: http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/.

5.4 Thesis Research and Continuous Registration

Students who are not taking regular courses, as well as students in their final semester of coursework who do not require 9 credits of regular coursework to meet their degree requirements, register for Thesis Research or Continuous Registration. In general, students working on a Master’s Thesis (but not a Master’s Research Paper) or Doctoral Dissertation will register for Thesis Research. Others who need to maintain a registration status will register for Continuous Registration. There are several sections of each, which are used under different circumstances. Students should consult sections F.4 and F.5 of the Graduate Bulletin (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/) for details, and discuss with their advisor which sections are appropriate for their circumstances.

5.5 Transfer of credit

Upon the recommendation of the Department, the Graduate School may allow students to transfer credit for graduate-level courses taken elsewhere to their Georgetown graduate program. In order to be eligible, the course must have received at least a grade of B and must have been taken at another accredited institution or at Georgetown prior to entry into any Georgetown graduate program. Note that any courses taken in the Georgetown School for Continuing Studies prior to matriculation are not automatically transferred to the current degree program.

Requests for transfer of credit may not be made until after a student has completed one semester of full-time registration within the Department. Since both students and the Department will want to know early on in the graduate program what courses are likely to transfer, the Department requires students to consult with their advisors during the first semester of study at Georgetown to determine if any transfer credits can be recommended, but note that the final decision rests with the Graduate School. The Graduate School requires that an official transcript be on file in order to approve a transfer of credit.

There are strict limits on the number of credits which may be transferred. All students must earn at least 75% of the credits for their degrees at Georgetown while enrolled in their degree program. This means that the total number of transferred credits including those for consortium courses and courses taken through the School of Continuing Studies as a non-degree seeking student, cannot exceed 25% of the required credits. Doctoral students may not transfer more than 25% of the required credits, after advanced standing has been taken into account. For example, if a Ph.D. student receives 12 credits of advanced standing, reducing the required credits from 54 to 42, he or she is then eligible to transfer an additional 9 credits (three courses, less than 25% of 42).

Please note: A student can only transfer courses that have not been applied to an earned degree. If a student has earned a previous graduate degree and would like to use that work to shorten the Ph.D. program, he or she can request these credits be applied to advanced standing, but cannot apply to transfer credit. See Section 1.3.1. for additional details about advanced standing. Also note that waiving a required course on the basis of previous coursework is not the same as transferring the credit or receiving advanced standing; when a course is waived, the credits are not applied to the current degree program, and the degree program is not shortened. Therefore, in such a case the student must select a course to take the waived course’s place.

Please consult Section III.B of the Graduate Bulletin (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/) for full details.

5.6 Intensive coursework

No student in a Master’s program in Linguistics may apply more than 12 credit hours of intensive coursework (such as short summer courses) toward the degree. This includes intensive coursework taken after admission to the program, and intensive coursework taken in Georgetown’s School for Continuing Studies.

5.7 Turn-around time

For long pieces of writing, students must allow faculty members adequate time to evaluate the work. Students should allow three weeks turn-around time for anything longer than 10 to 15 pages. Please keep this in mind as you plan submissions. Note that faculty members are not obligated to read student work during the summer months, although some may choose to do so.

5.8 University and Department-specific Deadlines

Each semester the Department publishes ‘Important Dates for Students’, which lists important deadlines for Master’s Research paper/Summative Portfolios, Qualifying Papers, examinations, and so on. Students can view the calendar at: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/graduate-student-deadlines.

In addition, all graduate students must be aware of the registration schedule, withdrawal deadlines, academic calendar, course schedules, and other important academic information published each semester by the University Registrar.  The Registrar’s website (and academic calendar) can be found at:  http://registrar.georgetown.edu/

The Graduate School awards degrees each month, with the exception of June. Application deadlines and deadlines for completing degree requirements are given in the Graduate School Catalog (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/how-to-graduate/). Special deadlines apply for those who intend to participate in the May commencement ceremonies.

5.9 Incompletes and non-recorded grades

The Department of Linguistics adheres to the Graduate School regulations regarding “Incomplete” and “Non-Recorded” grades: grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/. If an “I” or “NR” is assigned by an instructor and is not subsequently changed to a grade by the instructor before the last day of classes in the following semester, it will be converted to an “F” on the student’s transcript.

In addition to the Graduate School Policies specified in section III.A.3 of the Graduate Bulletin, the Linguistics Department has other restrictions regarding Incompletes:

Doctoral students will not be permitted to take the Oral Examination until they have completed the required 54 credit hours of Ph.D.-level coursework. Incompletes do not count toward the 54 credit hours.

Master’s Research Papers and Master’s Theses will not be accepted unless the student has completed the required number of credits for a Master’s degree, unencumbered by Incompletes.

Students who hold a Georgetown University fellowship or assistantship will not be permitted to have more than one Incomplete grade at any one time.

Students will not be permitted to have more than two “Incompletes" on their record at any one time; except under exceptional circumstances, such a student will not be allowed to continue taking coursework or to fulfill any degree requirements until the incompletes are completed.

5.10 Academic Integrity and Academic Misconduct

Students in the Department are expected to maintain the highest standards of integrity and proper conduct in pursuit of their education. Academic dishonesty in any form is a serious offense against the academic community in general and against Georgetown University in particular. Students found to have violated standard of academic integrity or to have engaged in academic misconduct will be subject to academic penalties. These penalties may include, but are not limited to, suspension or dismissal from the University and revocation of degrees already conferred.

Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the following (listed from the Graduate Bulletin): plagiarism, unacknowledged paraphrase, cheating, fabrication of data, fabrication, alteration, or misrepresentation of academic records, facilitating academic dishonesty, unauthorized collaboration, misuse of otherwise valid academic work, misuse of academic resources, and depriving others of equal access to academic resources. It is the responsibility of students to understand what constitutes proper academic behavior. Students who have any doubt as to what constitutes proper citation or whether any specific actions might constitute a violation of academic integrity are strongly urged to consult their instructor or advisor. The Department will adhere to the policies for resolving alleged violations laid out in the Graduate Bulletin, Section VI: Academic Integrity: Policies and Procedures (view/download the Graduate Bulletin from the top of the Policies page at: grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/.

5.11 Undergraduate Tutorial

A student may request graduate credit for an undergraduate course if the course is required to complete degree requirements or is used as a substitute for a required graduate course. Petitions to take undergraduate courses for graduate credit must be supported by a signed Tutorial Registration form submitted during the Add/Drop period. The completed form requires the stipulation by the course instructor of additional work to justify the award of graduate credit. The completed form must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate School. Without the completed approval form, only undergraduate credit will be shown on the student’s transcript and the credits will not count toward graduate program requirements. The registration procedures are the same as those used for graduate tutorials. The student is responsible for insuring that the form is prepared and approved during scheduled registration periods. Graduate credit for such courses will not be allowed retroactively.

5.12 Appeals

The Graduate School has established procedures for appeal of a grade  or the termination of degree candidacy.  

If a graduate student feels that there is good reason to appeal an official grade, the policies and procedures for this are found in the Graduate Bulletin, Section III-A-5: Academic Regulations and Procedures /The Grading System / Appeals Contesting Grades  (view/download the Graduate Bulletin from the top of the Policies page at: http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/).

Questions may be addressed to the Director of Graduate Studies.
 

5.13 Institutional Review Board

All research conducted by faculty and students of the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University which uses data from human subjects must be approved by the University’s Institutional Review Board for the Social and Behavioral Sciences (IRB-C: See ora.georgetown.edu/irb/) to be in compliance with Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 46: Protection of Human Subjects: www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/ECFR?page=browse. This section provides guidance to Linguistics students concerning how to meet IRB requirements for research involving human subjects. Please note that the official requirements are determined by the IRB, and students should become familiar with the information on the IRB website.

Applying for IRB approval can be a time-consuming process, and so students must make sure to allow time for the completion and submission of necessary documents, including an online certification that must be completed prior to submission and which must be updated periodically. In the best case, approval from the IRB takes 2-4 weeks, but this assumes that all necessary materials have been submitted correctly and completely and there is no issue with the proposal which would require it to be submitted to a full board review.

Linguistics faculty and students must not commence any research with human subjects until they apply for and receive IRB approval of their study and of the specific procedures they propose to use. Faculty or students who collect data in unapproved studies or via unapproved elicitation devices may be required to destroy that data; they may even face legal action. Lack of compliance with these requirements may constitute a violation of federal law and could place the University in jeopardy of federal sanctions.

In limited instances, students may collect data for course papers or projects without IRB approval. These issues will be discussed at the beginning of any course for which such data collection and analysis is an integral part. Generally speaking, a research project conducted to fulfill the requirements of one specific course is not considered to require permission for research with human subjects. For example, if a student’s grade in a class requires her to turn in a research paper, then any research conducted solely for that paper (even if it would otherwise be considered research with human subjects that requires IRB review) does not need to be reviewed or approved by the IRB.

If there is a possibility that the findings from a course study will be used for a “research purpose” as defined by the IRB, for example as part of a Master’s Research paper, Thesis or dissertation, or presented at a conference or expanded into a publication, it would be sensible to submit an IRB application before such data collection. The IRB will never give retroactive approval to research already conducted, and so failure to gain approval before beginning a course project or paper would preclude using that project/paper for any future research use, including all those listed above.

Although the IRB never grants approval for research already conducted, it is possible to gain approval to use data for research which was previously collected for a non-research purpose. This situation most often arises in our Department when a student conducts research solely to comply with a class requirement, but later realizes that he/she would like to use the collected data as part of a Master’s Research Paper, Thesis, etc. This case falls under “the use of previously collected data” because research done solely to complete a class requirement does not count as a “research purpose” needing approval by the IRB. (Note that IRB approval would still be prospective, in the sense that the IRB would approve the proposed future research use of previously-collected data and not the original collection of the data.) A student may not use this to circumvent IRB requirements. For example, a student cannot collect data with the intention of using it for a Master’s Research Paper, Thesis, etc. without proper approval, and then seek permission to use this data as previously collected data. Only data collected for a legitimate non-research purpose (such as completing a class requirement) could be subsequently approved for research use. Moreover, it is important to understand that a request for approval to use previously collected data only extends to the data, not to the research using the data. In practice, this means that a student cannot revise or expand a course paper or project conducted without IRB approval into a Thesis, part of a dissertation, presentation, or publication.

Electronic applications for IRB review can be downloaded from: https://eric.ora.georgetown.edu/eric  
Note that the Department Chair must sign off on IRB applications within the Linguistics Department, so students should leave at least one week for the Chair’s review.
Most (but not all) Linguistics research is found by the IRB to be eligible for ‘Expedited Review’. In other words, it involves research procedures involving no more than ‘minimal risk,’ and falls in Research Categories 6 and 7:

(6) Collection of data from voice, video, digital, or image recordings made for research purposes.
(7) research on individual or group characteristics or behavior (including, but not limited to, research on perception, cognition, motivation, identity, language, communication, cultural beliefs or practices, and social behavior) or research employing survey, interview, oral history, focus group, program evaluation, human factors evaluation, or quality assurance methodologies.” (PI Submission Forms, page 12)

Applications for permission to use previously collected data (in particular, to use data collected previously to fulfill a course requirement) are eligible for expedited review under Category 5(a):

(5) Research involving materials (data, documents, records, or specimens) that:
      (a) have already been collected for some other purpose

Research falling under Categories 5 and 7 may also be ‘exempt’ from IRB requirements. This determination is one that must be made by the IRB Chair.

In order to apply for expedited review and/or an exemption, a student should fill out the relevant form(s) – the C-3 form or the C-4 form – on the IRB-C Forms website (link above). If a student is unsure as to which form of review is appropriate, both the C-3 and the C-4 forms should be submitted.

Questions should be directed to Institutional Review Board: irboard@georgetown.edu or 202-687-1506.  Information about submission of IRB forms can be found on the IRB website: http://ora.georgetown.edu/irb/.

Additionally, Georgetown University recently established a Protection of Minors Policy to protect those under 18 years of age who participate in programs and activities associated with the University and to provide guidance to University students, faculty and staff who are involved with such programs and activities.  If you have questions, please contact the Office of Compliance and Ethics (http://compliance.georgetown.edu) at 202-687-6493 or by email at protectionofminors@georgetown.edu.  Consult the full policy here: http://protectionofminors.georgetown.edu/policy/.

5.14 Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT)

Curricular Practical Training (CPT) is an employment authorization that allow students on F-1 visas to work off campus in a position directly related to their field of study, such as an internship, fellowship cooperative education, or any other type of required practicum.  Permission from the student’s advisor, the instructor, and the DGS are all required, along with a letter of support from the advisor.  A student may take this one-credit course up to three times.  Regular tuition rates apply.  Please consult the Office of Global Services for the full policy: http://internationalservices.georgetown.edu/cpt-faqs/.

Optional Practical Training (OPT) is an employment authorization that allows students on F-1 visas to apply knowledge gained in their program of study to off-campus work in their major field.  OPT is authorized by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).  The authorization process can take up to 3 months. The maximum amount of time granted to work on F-1 OPT status is 12 months per degree level. F-1 students may apply to use some or all of the available 12 months of practical training during the course of study or may save some or all of the full twelve months to use after graduation. Students MUST file the application within 30 days of getting the new I-20 from OGS.  Please consult the Office of Global Services for the full policy: http://internationalservices.georgetown.edu/pre-completion-opt-faqs/.

Effective with the Fall 2014 semester, F-1 students must receive work/training authorization through the Office of Global Services prior to participating in either a paid or an unpaid internship/training experience.  Please consult OGS for the full policy and federal regulations: http://globalservices.georgetown.edu/international-students-scholars/cpt.

5.15 Language Scholarships

Undergraduate language courses may not be applied to a graduate degree program, and as a result the Graduate School scholarships and assistantships administered through the Department cannot be used to pay tuition for such courses. However, the Graduate School has a policy for awarding Language Study Scholarships under certain circumstances. In overview, the Graduate School may apply a scholarship to cover the tuition at Georgetown for no more than one language course per semester, when the student needs to obtain proficiency in the language for research or to meet a proficiency requirement.  Ph.D. students may register for courses at any level that are taken for the purpose of developing research abilities. Master's students may register for courses designed to improve their language skills. Normally, these are courses at the 350 level or below.  Ph.D. students may request scholarships for the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters; Master’s students may request scholarships for the Fall and Spring semesters. Students obtaining these scholarships are expected to make their fullest effort in the course; the course must be taken for a grade, and if the student withdraws from the course the scholarship will be removed and the student will be personally responsible for tuition owed. Students should consult section II.E 4 of the Graduate Bulletin for more details (grad.georgetown.edu/academics/policies/).

5.16 Accelerated Master’s Degrees

Undergraduate majors in Georgetown’s Department of Linguistics may apply for an Accelerated Option in either of the Master’s degrees.

The requirements for the Accelerated Masters degrees are the same as those for the regular (non-accelerated) programs, but they may be satisfied more quickly:

a) Two graduate-level courses (numbered LING 350 or higher) taken during the third or fourth year may be applied to both the student’s Bachelor’s degree and to the Master’s degree.
b) Up to two additional graduate-level courses (numbered LING 350 or higher) taken during the fourth year beyond what is required for the B.A. degree (38 courses, 120 credits) may be applied to the Master’s degree.

The requirements for admission to the Accelerated Masters Degrees are as follows:

a) Only Linguistics majors (including students with a double major in Linguistics and another major) with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5 overall and in the Linguistics major are eligible.
b) Qualifying students should apply in their third academic year by the appropriate deadline for the specific Master’s program they are interested in. Applications are reviewed in the same pool as all graduate applicants. The application consists of a completed Graduate School application form, a copy of the student’s undergraduate transcript, three letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and a writing sample. Applicants do not have to take the GRE.

Students who have the goal of participating in an Accelerated Master’s program are urged to discuss their plans with their advisors early in their third academic year.
 

PART II: CONCENTRATION-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

We have four concentrations in the Department of Linguistics:

Applied Linguistics

Computational Linguistics

Sociolinguistics

Theoretical Linguistics

Some students whose interests do not fit naturally into one of the four concentrations are admitted in a category of General Linguistics. In addition to one of these concentrations, PhD students may apply to add a secondary interdisciplinary concentration in Cognitive Science. See the Cognitive Science website (http://cogsci.georgetown.edu) for further information on applying to this concentration and its requirements. Please remember that the requirements in Part I apply to students in all concentrations as well as those in the General category. Specific requirements for each group are set forth below.

1. The Concentration in Applied Linguistics
1.1 M.S. in Applied Linguistics

Overall course requirements: 36 credits, 30 of which must be taken from the Linguistics Department’s course offerings.

Departmental course requirements: 9 credits. See departmental guidelines (Part I, Section 3) regarding the fulfillment of coursework requirements.

Applied Linguistics courses: 9 credits, or three courses, chosen from among at least the following Applied Linguistics area concentration courses. Please note prerequisites, as they affect planning when to take courses.

LING 350: Language Testing
LING 451: Language Acquisition
LING 456: Second Language Writing
LING 494: Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching
LING 546: Telecollaboration
LING 553: Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism
LING 651: Bilingualism
LING 681 Research Design and Methods

Applied Linguistics electives: Three or more electives may be selected from among all the Linguistics Department courses or from courses offered by other departments (see the schedule of classes for listings and descriptions: registrar.georgetown.edu/). The choice of electives is subject to approval of the advisor. A total of 30 credits must be taken from within the Linguistics Department course offerings.

Language proficiency: All Master’s students in the Applied Linguistics concentration must demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language. (see Part I, Section 2 for details).

Master’s Research Paper: Following the departmental guidelines in Part I, Section 1.2, students are required to submit a research paper on any topic of interest in Applied Linguistics.

1.2 Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics

Overall course requirements: A doctoral student in Linguistics is required to complete a total of 54 credit hours. Up to 6 credits, or two courses, may be taken in other departments or through the Consortium (see Part I, Section 4). The Department also strongly recommends that each student take at least one course with each faculty member in the concentration. This will not only provide the student with the opportunity to learn about a variety of approaches to the study of language and society but will also facilitate the selection of oral examination and dissertation committees.

Departmental distribution requirements courses: 15 credits. See departmental guidelines (Part I, Section 3) regarding the fulfillment of distribution requirements.

Applied Linguistics courses: Both of the following courses are required for the purpose of developing research skills:

LING 584: Statistics for Linguistics Research
LING 681: Research Design and Methodology

Three seminars are required of all Applied Linguistics doctoral students. At least two seminars chosen should be on Applied Linguistics topics, and at least two should be offered by Applied Linguistics faculty. A seminar offered in another Department or through the Consortium may be taken, subject to approval of the advisor. Faculty will either approve the course through faculty access if taken here at Georgetown, or sign off on the consortium registration form. Seminar topics vary from year to year; therefore this list may not be complete:

Seminar: LING 726: L2 Development and Study Abroad
Seminar: LING 727: Topics in Bilingualism
Seminar: LING 746: Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis
Seminar: LING 749: Topics in Cognitive Linguistics
Seminar: LING 751: Topics in Applied Linguistics
Seminar: LING 754: Input, Interaction, and Individual Differences
Seminar: LING 755: Topics in SLA
Seminar: LING 760: Usage-based Approaches to Multilingualism

Applied Linguistics electives: Electives may be selected from among all the Linguistics Department courses or from courses offered by other departments (see the catalogue for listings and descriptions) or through the consortium. The choice of electives is subject to approval of the advisor.

Notes on other requirements:

Qualifying Review: At least two of the letters of recommendation should be from Applied Linguistics faculty members.

Ph.D. Oral Examination: The oral exam will focus on topics related to the candidate’s intended dissertation research: Furthermore, the candidate should be prepared to answer questions of basic research design related to the intended dissertation research.

Dissertation Committee: The mentor should be a member of the Applied Linguistics faculty and should have expertise in your proposed area of research. On our website, you may view statements prepared by each Applied Linguistics faculty member indicating those areas of expertise (as potential mentors) and interest (as potential readers) as well as a brief overview of preferred mentoring style. We also suggest meeting with faculty members in person to discuss mentoring style and interests. These discussions may help you in finding the right mentor for your research project.

Dissertation proposal: We recommend that you consult with your mentor and committee for guidelines and proposal length as this can vary depending on area, topic and mentor. The bibliography and the literature review should be as comprehensive as possible. The procedure and probable contents section may be in outline format. The proposal should be submitted to your committee who will then provide feedback and determine whether the proposal is acceptable. Once approved and submitted to the Department, you will then begin the dissertation research.

Writing the dissertation: This is the most flexible part of the process, as candidates and their mentors have varying working styles. It is important to establish early on how this working relationship will be organized. Please ask your mentor and your committee members how they would like to read your Thesis chapters and provide feedback (for example, chapter by chapter vs. reading the complete Thesis). Please remain in constant contact with your mentor regarding matters such as sabbaticals, leaves of absence, or extended travel (either yours or that of your mentor).

Dissertation defense: Once the dissertation has been completed and your mentor agrees that you are ready to defend, a copy should be submitted to each member of your committee at least one month in advance of the scheduled defense. You will work out the details of the presentation of the research with your mentor.


2. The Concentration in Computational Linguistics
2.1 M.S. in Computational Linguistics

The M.S. in Computational Linguistics prepares students for research and development careers in the field, as well as for advanced study at the Ph.D. level.

Overall course requirements:

              Either:

-24 credit hours and a Master’s Thesis, or
-30 credit hours and a Master’s Research Paper.

To complete a Master’s Thesis, students must submit a proposal to their advisor and to the Graduate School. The Thesis will be mentored by the faculty advisor with or without additional readers. Upon completion, the Master’s Thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School. The Master’s Research Paper has neither of these requirements (see Part I Section 1.2 above for further details concerning the Master’s Thesis and Master’s Research Paper).

Computational Linguistics courses:

Required core computational courses:

LING 362: Introduction to Natural Language Processing
LING 367: Computational Corpus Linguistics
One course in a programming or scripting language (e.g. Python for programming proficiency.) This requirement can be waived for students who already have programming proficiency. 
One seminar in computational linguistics (or another area of linguistics, if approved by the advisor)

Required core linguistics courses: 

          LING 411: Phonology I
          LING 427: Syntax I
          LING 531: Semantics & Pragmatics I

These courses can be waived with prior linguistics coursework.

Electives can be selected from the following list. The number of electives will vary depending on the program (24 credits vs. 30 credits) and on whether any core courses have been waived.

COSC 387: Artificial Intelligence
COSC 502: Programming Concepts & Tools
COSC 503: Objects & Algorithms
COSC 578: Statistical Machine Learning
LING 413 Acoustic Phonetics
LING 412: Phonology II
LING 461: Signal Processing
LING 466: Machine Translation
LING 467: Information Extraction & Retrieval
LING 469: Analyzing Language Data with R

LING 428: Syntax I
LING 532: Semantics & Pragmatics II
LING 564: Computational Grammar Formalisms
LING 572: Emperical Methods in NLP
LING 765: Computational Discourse Modelling

Depending on the students' prior linguistics and computer science background, the faculty advisor may allow substituting of the core courses with other more advanced courses from the electives list or other course offerings. The programming language requirement may be satisfied by passing a programming languages proficiency examination.

2.1 Ph.D. in Computational Linguistics

Overall course requirements: A doctoral student in Linguistics is required to have a total of 54 credit hours. For students concentrating in Computational Linguistics, roughly half the coursework should be in the concentration (which may include courses in Computer Science and Cognitive Science), the specific courses to be approved by the student’s advisor.

Departmental distribution requirements: 15 credits. See departmental guidelines (Part I, Section 3).

Computational Linguistics courses: The Computational Linguistics program requires Introduction to Natural Language Processing (LING 367), one or more programming courses (offered by the Department of Computer Science), and at least one seminar.


3. The Concentration in Sociolinguistics
3.1 M.S. in Sociolinguistics

Overall course requirements: 36 credits hours, with at least five courses in Sociolinguistics.
Departmental course requirements: See Part I, Section 3, above.

Sociolinguistics courses: M.S. students in Sociolinguistics are required to take LING 571: Sociolinguistic Field Methods. It is also recommended that students take courses from a range of faculty members in Sociolinguistics, as well as courses on both quantitative (e.g. LING 481: Sociolinguistic Variation) and qualitative approaches to sociolinguistics (e.g. LING 483: Discourse Analysis: Narrative; LING 484: Discourse Analysis: Conversation).

Supplemental Courses: Any remaining hours of a Master’s student's program are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the student's faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses in sociolinguistics, other linguistics courses, and possibly courses in other departments.

Supplemental Courses: Any remaining hours of a Master's student's program are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the student's faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses in sociolinguistics, other linguistics courses, and possibly courses in other departments.

Language proficiency: M.S. students in the Sociolinguistics concentration must demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language. See Part I, Section 2 above for information on how to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Master's Research Paper: Following the departmental guidelines in Part I, Section 1.2, all M.S. students in Sociolinguistics must submit a research paper on a topic of interest in Sociolinguistics.

3.2 M.A. in Linguistics with a Concentration in Language and Communication (MLC)

The MLC prepares students to use linguistics, especially the areas of discourse analysis (including narrative analysis and cross cultural communication), sociolinguistics, and pragmatics in the workforce. The degree will prepare students for careers in fields such as human resources, education, mediation and arbitration, technical and scientific writing, management, international communication, diversity training, counseling, advertising, marketing, usability testing, public relations, and media/ public opinion research. The MLC also offers broad training in the analysis of language and communication, with a possible focus on language and health care, language and the law, or language and business.

Overall requirements: 8 courses (24 credits) plus Master's Thesis or 10 courses (30 credits). (Note that students participating in the Accelerated Master's program may not choose the Thesis option.)

Please note that there is no foreign language requirement.

Course requirements:

• General Linguistics. Students with no significant background in linguistics should register for one of the following courses in their first year. Course selection should be made in consultation with the advisor. (This requirement may be waived for students with a linguistics background.) 

LING 401: General Linguistics
LING 410: Phonetics
LING 411: Phonology
LING 427: Syntax I
LING 485: Cognitive Grammar
LING 531: Semantics & Pragmatics I

• LING 487: MLC Proseminar. This is a professionalization course designed to illustrate how to use linguistics in professional contexts. Offered in the Spring semester. Student participation is required in professional development events throughout the year.
• 3 additional “core” courses, which cultivate methodological, theoretical, and core analytical competencies (in sociolinguistics including variation analysis or discourse analysis) to be selected from the following (note that course offerings are subject to change):

LING 481: Sociolinguistic Variation
LING 482: Approaches to Discourse
LING 483: Discourse Analysis: Narrative
LING 484: Discourse Analysis: Conversation
LING 495: Ethnography of Communication
LING 496: Intercultural Communication
LING 570: Introduction to Sociolinguistics
LING 571: Sociolinguistic Field Methods

Electives:
3- 5 courses (depending on Master's Thesis option), to be selected from the above list (with permission from advisor) or from the following (note that course offerings are subject to change):

LING 352: Foundations of Education
LING 355: Language in the USA
LING 367: Computational Corpus Linguistics
LING 380: Language and Politics
LING 385: Language and Multimedia Discourse
LING 387: Language, Culture, and Thought
LING 402: Forensic Linguistics
LING 403: Language and the Law
LING 405: Language and Social Media
LING 445: Language Contact
LING 447: American Dialects
LING 454: Linguistics and Reading
LING 584: Statistics for Linguistics Research
LING 586: Language and Identity
LING 583: Intertextuality
LING 586: Language and Identity
LING 589: Institutional Discourse

Alternative courses that reflect the needs and interests of individual students may be selected under the guidance of the faculty advisor. They may include courses in the Linguistics Department and other departments or schools within Georgetown, as well as courses at area universities (e.g. American, George Mason, George Washington) through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities (see Part I, Section 4) on topics including, but not limited to: Anthropological Linguistics, Healthcare Communication, Language and Aging, Language and Culture, Language and Gender, Language and the Media, Language and the Professions, etc.

3.3 Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics

Overall course requirements: A doctoral student in Linguistics is required to have a total of 54 credit hours. For students concentrating in Sociolinguistics, at least nine courses (27 credits) must be in the concentration. Sociolinguistics courses taken as part of the departmental distributional requirements count toward the required 27 credits. These nine sociolinguistics courses include one required course in LING 571: Sociolinguistic Field Methods early in the program and two seminars (chosen from a range of topics) later in the program. We also strongly recommend that each student take at least one course with each faculty member in the concentration. This will not only provide the student with the opportunity to learn about a variety of approaches to the study of language and society but will also facilitate the selection of oral examination and dissertation committee members.

Departmental distribution requirements: 15 credits. See departmental guidelines (Part I, Section 3) regarding the fulfillment of departmental coursework requirements.

Supplemental Courses: Any remaining hours of a Ph.D. student's program are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the student's faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses in sociolinguistics, other linguistics courses, and possibly courses in other departments.


4. The Concentration in Theoretical Linguistics
4.1 M.S. with a concentration in Theoretical Linguistics

Overall course requirements: For Master’s students concentrating in Theoretical Linguistics, at least 21 credit hours must be in the concentration.

Departmental Distribution requirements: The Theoretical Linguistics courses listed below will result in the satisfaction of the departmental distribution requirements.

Theoretical Linguistics courses: The departmental distributional requirements will be satisfied with Syntax I (LING 427), Phonology I (LING 411), and Semantics & Pragmatics I (LING 531). In addition, M.S. students concentrating in Theoretical Linguistics must take at least three of the following four courses:

          LING 412: Phonology II 
          LING 428: Syntax II
          LING 451: Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition 
          LING 532: Semantics and Pragmatics II  

All four courses are recommended, if the student’s schedule allows. M.S. students must also take at least one seminar in the concentration.

Supplemental courses: The remaining hours of a student's program are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses in Theoretical Linguistics, linguistics courses in other concentrations, courses in other departments, and courses at area universities through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities (see Part I, Section 4).

4.2 Ph.D. with a concentration in Theoretical Linguistics

Overall course requirements: For Ph.D. students, at least 33 credit hours of the required 54 credit hours must be in the concentration. Theoretical courses taken as part of the departmental distributional requirements count toward the 33 hour total.

Departmental Distribution requirements: The Theoretical Linguistics courses required result in the satisfaction of all departmental distribution requirements except for Language Use.  Students should consult with their advisors about which course is the best choice for fulfilling that requirement.

Theoretical Linguistics courses: All Ph.D. students concentrating in Theoretical Linguistics must take the following courses:

LING 410: Phonetics
LING 411: Phonology I
LING 412: Phonology II
LING 427: Generative Syntax I,
LING 428: Generative Syntax II
LING 449: Historical Linguistics or LING 440: Diachronic Syntax
LING 451: Language Acquisition
LING 531: Semantics and Pragmatics I
LING 532: Semantics and Pragmatics II
Two seminars

Ph.D. students will elect a subject-matter track within the concentration. There are tracks in Syntax, Semantics, Phonology, Historical Linguistics, and Language Acquisition. The Theoretical tracks differ in the more advanced concentration courses required. Students should consult with their advisors to determine which advanced courses are appropriate.

Supplemental courses: The remaining hours of a student's program are taken as supplemental courses, selected under the guidance of the faculty advisor. These courses will reflect the needs and interests of the individual student. They may include additional courses in Theoretical Linguistics, linguistics courses in other concentrations, courses in other departments, and courses at area universities through the Washington Area Consortium of Universities.

Requirements beyond coursework: The Ph.D. program is designed to provide students with knowledge of all the core areas of linguistic theory and to develop a level of expertise in one or more which will allow them to pursue a career in teaching and research at the college/university level. These goals raise commitments beyond those of the formal coursework. It is expected that students will further their development by:

a) attending speaker series talks at Georgetown, including all talks within theoretical linguistics,
b) participating in reading and research groups within the department,
c) taking advantage of colloquia within the Washington area,
d) attending conferences,
e) submitting abstracts to conferences,
f) publication of quality research in some area of linguistic theory.

In order to meet these standards, it is always necessary to be engaged in an intellectual community. Students should therefore actively seek discussion and input on their research from their fellow students, teachers, and—at a certain stage—linguists beyond Georgetown.
 

5. General Linguistics

Some students whose interests do not fit naturally into any of the existing concentrations (for example, because their research will cross multiple concentrations) are admitted into a category of General Linguistics. Ph.D. students in General Linguistics must take at least two seminars, but beyond this, requirements for General Linguistics students will be determined in consultation with the advisor (and other relevant faculty, as applicable). Note that the degree requirements discussed in Section I for all M.S. and Ph.D. apply to General Students, as they do to students in the four concentrations.

PART III: LIFE IN THE LINGUISTICS DEPARTMENT

1. Financial Support

Need-Based Aid - Office of Student Financial Services: The Office of Student Financial Services (OSFS) provides counseling services to prospective and current students and their families about:

  • Options available for financing higher education costs
  • Eligibility for assistance
  • Applying for and obtaining funding
  • Budgeting expenses and paying bills

For both undergraduate and graduate students, the OSFS determines eligibility for assistance from federal, state and private financial aid programs based on the rules and regulations established by those external agencies: http://finaid.georgetown.edu/contact-us/

Doctoral Assistantships: Doctoral assistantships provided by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences may be awarded to students who show promise of excellence in graduate studies. Assistantships, which carry a service obligation, provide a stipend, health insurance, and tuition (typically for three courses a semester) or Thesis Research fees. Assistantships are normally renewable for five years, subject to review of performance.

Doctoral assistants are expected to work 15 hours per week (averaged over the course of the semester).  Note that international students are subject to restrictions concerning the number of hours worked per week.  Please consult with the Office of Global Services for more information.)  Assistantship assignments and responsibilities vary.  Students may be assigned to work with a particular faculty member as a Teaching Assistant (TA) or Research Assistant (RA), to work on a particular department-level project or task (such as assisting with the linguistics lab or with planning for a conference), or to teach a section of an undergraduate course, such as Introduction to Language.  We attempt to accommodate student and faculty requests for particular assignments, but students should be aware that this is not always possible.  All first-year assistants (not just those assigned as TAs) are required to attend the Departmental Teaching Practicum (see Part III Section 2 below) as part of their assistantship assignment.

Students that take on other work in addition to fellowship duties should discuss this with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies and let them know the number of hours they are working in addition to the hours required by the fellowship, both on and off-campus. The graduate school restricts students on stipend to no more than five hours per week of work on campus outside of the assistantship; be sure to observe this limit. Finally, international students on student visas are reminded that, under the terms of their visas, they cannot take on more than 20 hours per week in total. (These 20 hours include the 15 hours required for the fellowship.)

Doctoral assistantship holders are expected to complete the assignments given them under the terms of their assistantship and to maintain an excellent academic record in their graduate work. Assistants are required to maintain a GPA of at least 3.67. They should, in addition, demonstrate outstanding skills in writing and research.

Assistantship holders are evaluated at the end of each semester by the departmental Assistantship Committee, which consists of the concentration heads and the Director of Graduate Studies. Students who fail to maintain the required GPA, or who do not achieve satisfactory performance in their assistantship assignment, will be placed on probation for one semester. If performance improves, the student will be restored to good standing. If performance does not improve, the assistantship will not be renewed. In the case of a student not passing a degree requirement, e.g. Qualifying Review, resulting in a switch from the Ph.D. program to the M.S., the student will not be eligible to continue as an assistant.

The Department has approximately 40 doctoral assistantships available to it. Most assistantships are awarded to new applicants to the doctoral program, but continuing Ph.D. students may also be eligible for assistantship awards. Awards are typically made each spring and fall for the following semester. Awards to current students are usually for a single semester or academic year, though longer terms are sometimes awarded. The Fellowship Committee makes funding recommendations to the Graduate School Deans Office, which offers the formal awards.

Note that Assistantships funded by the Graduate School cannot be held beyond the five years (10 semesters) from beginning the Ph.D. program.  Exceptions are only possible when a student has taken an approved leave of absence for certain reasons (e.g. military or medical leave) or has received a prestigious outside fellowship (e.g. a Fulbright) during the first five years of the program.

Scholarships: Full and partial scholarships for tuition or Thesis Research fees (without a stipend or health insurance coverage) are sometimes available for continuing Ph.D. students. No work assignment is attached to a scholarship. Scholarships are awarded for a term of one or two semesters. The fellowship committee will consider eligible students on a semester basis.

Teaching Associates: The Department sometimes hires advanced Ph.D. students to teach undergraduate courses. The terms are typically identical to those of Doctoral Assistantships.

Other Sources: Students are encouraged to apply for individual support from appropriate sources. Please consult the Department website (linguistics.georgetown.edu/graduate/apply/funding/), the Office of Student Financial Aid (finaid.georgetown.edu/apply-now/graduate/) and the Graduate School (grad.georgetown.edu/financial-support/) for information about external grants and fellowships.

Student Research Travel Grants: The Linguistics Department and Graduate School are pleased to support the professional development of graduate students by providing Conference Travel Grants to both master's and doctoral students.  Application deadlines and requirements will be announced during the academic year. 

The Graduate School also invites nominations for Dissertation Research Travel awards for up to $5,000 each. These competitive awards support the travel costs of students enrolled in doctoral students engaged in archival or field research outside the United States.

Details for Linguistics travel grant program are available at: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/graduate-student-travel-grants

Details for Graduate School programs are available at: https://grad.georgetown.edu/financial-support/student-research-funding.
 


2. Linguistics Teaching Practicum (Ling 501 & Ling 502)

The Linguistics Teaching Practicum (LING 501 & LING 502) is a two-semester, non-credit (and thus no-fee) course that meets for one 75-minute period each week. The practicum covers topics concerning teaching linguistics at the graduate and undergraduate level, provides students with resources for teaching, and gives students an opportunity for discussion. Upon successful completion the course will appear on their official transcript. The class is required for all first-year Departmental Assistants, regardless of assignment, and for any TAs who have not previously taken the course, as part of their 15-hour departmental service requirement. Other students are invited, but not required, to participate. Incoming Department assistants who have a good deal of teaching experience may wish to speak with the faculty member in charge of the Teaching Practicum regarding the possibility of waiving the course. Assistants taking the practicum will be able to allocate one hour per week of their assistantship work to the practicum.


3. Communication
3.1 Mailboxes

The Department of Linguistics assigns student mailboxes each semester, located in the student lounge. 

3.2 E-mail and Computing Facilities

Georgetown students automatically receive a free account on the university computers which provides access to the Internet on university computers, email, university-supported software, the online library catalogue, and other useful services. Students may also apply for free Web space to develop personal homepages and academic projects (https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/uis-docs/students). For computer questions or problems contact the Student Help Desk at (202) 687-4949 or at help@georgetown.edu.

The Department, Graduate School, and other university offices use georgetown.edu email addresses to communicate with students.

3.3 GULINGUIST

GULINGUIST is an e-mail distribution list for Linguistics (and other interested) students and faculty at Georgetown. All students are automatically subscribed to this list in order to receive important announcements about courses, degree requirements, speakers, and other matters relating to the Department. If you wish to subscribe under an account other than your GUMail, send an e-mail to: listproc@listproc.georgetown.edu. The message should consist of the following line only: subscribe gulinguist emailaddress yourfirstname yourlastname
Sample Email: subscribe gulinguist hoyaj@georgetown.edu Jane Hoya

3.4 Website

The Department shares much important information on the public website linguistics.georgetown.edu and the internal website https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/


4. Getting Involved

Linguistics students have many opportunities to learn outside the classroom at Georgetown. Students are encouraged to interact with the many guest speakers who participate in our active Speakers Series, to listen to student and faculty practice talks in preparation for national and international conferences, and to participate in on-campus linguistics workshops and conferences, such as the Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (GURT) and the Georgetown Linguistics Society conference (see below). Monitor the GULINGUIST list and the Departmental web pages for up-to-date information on such activities.

Additionally, the organizations listed below offer students opportunities to participate in various aspects of the Department and the profession. Involvement in these organizations exposes students to some of the most current work in the field, provides settings in which to meet with linguists from all over the world, and offers valuable, hands-on professional experience.

Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of these important opportunities.

4.1 Georgetown Linguistics Student Association (GLSA) and Graduate Student Organization (GSO)

The GLSA’s focus is on enhancing the graduate experience at Georgetown. The organization is a primary source of information for students on all aspects of linguistics at Georgetown, particularly in relation to student life. Some of its main activities include organizing orientation for new students, assigning graduate student mentors to new students, organizing departmental social events, acting as an official liaison between faculty and students in part through an elected student representative who attends and reports on faculty meetings, and representing graduate students in Linguistics within the university as a whole through elected representation in the Graduate Student Government. For more information on the GLSA, please contact georgetownglsa@gmail.com.

Graduate Student Government is the governing body for graduate students and also serves as an advisory board for student organizations composed primarily of graduate students. To help unite graduate students across the Georgetown campus, Graduate Student Government hosts academic, networking, cultural and social events and also allocates funding to member organizations for events and programming. More information can be found at:  gradgov.com

4.2 Georgetown Undergraduate Linguistics Society (GULS)

GULS is the organization for Georgetown's undergraduate Linguistics majors and minors, or anyone who shares an interest in any kind of linguistics. Each semester the GULS plans a few academic events (guest speakers, workshops, etc.), as well as some social events. Graduate students are welcome to attend many of these functions.

4.3 Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL)

CAL (cal.org/) is a private, nonprofit organization engaged in the study of language and the application of linguistics to educational, cultural and social concerns. CAL’s work in recent years has been concerned with six specific areas: adult language education, cross-cultural communication, language variation, literacy, testing and assessment, and uncommonly taught languages. Its special resources and facilities include the ERIC Clearinghouse on Language and Linguistics, the National Clearinghouse on Literacy Education, an extensive bibliographic collection of tools for access to uncommonly taught languages, and a library.

4.4 Georgetown University Working Papers in Theoretical Linguistics (GUWPTL)

GUWPTL publishes student and faculty research in all areas of linguistics with a relation to linguistic theory. Graduate students decide on the theme of each issue of GUWPTL, organize the call for papers and peer review, and manage production and distribution. Any students with an interest in editing an issue of GUWPTL should consult with the Theoretical Linguistics concentration head.

4.5 Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (GURT)

GURT is an annual conference hosted by Georgetown's Linguistics Department.  The theme of GURT 2017 is “Variable Properties: Their Nature and Acquisition" organized by David Lightfoot. For more information:  https://gurt.georgetown.edu/GURT%202017.


5. University support resources

We aim to cultivate a supportive environment here in the Linguistics Department.  In addition to the above listed Department Offices and Staff , we encourage all graduate students to learn about and take advantage of the following resources when necessary or appropriate.

  • The Graduate Student Lounge is located at 3520 Prospect Street, on the roof pavilion (4th Floor) of the Car Barn.  It provides a quiet space exclusively for graduate students to study.  The Graduate Student Lounge is wifi-enabled, has comfortable seating and study desks, and is open weekdays from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. or as posted.
  • Office of Global Services (OGS): Issues of special relevance to international graduate students are handled by Georgetown University’s Office of Global Services.  These include visa and immigration issues; work visas; full-time/part-time study issues; emergency situations; and other topics.  For more information, please see their website: http://internationalservices.georgetown.edu/. The OGS offices are located in the Car Barn building at 3520 Prospect Street, N.W. (near 35th and Prospect Street) in Suite #210.
  • Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) serves the mental health care needs of students and the campus community from their location on the main campus in Darnall Hall.  More information can be found at: http://studenthealth.georgetown.edu/mental-health/
  • The Graduate Student Ombuds Office provides an informal, impartial, neutral, and confidential environment where graduate students can discuss University-related concerns and disputes. The Ombuds office does not advocate for any individual point of view, and does not participate in any formal grievance process, but works to promote a fair process for all. The function of the Graduate Student Ombuds Officer is to listen thoughtfully and sympathetically to the concerns of graduate students and to assist them in identifying options for addressing their concerns.  The Graduate Student Ombuds website is available at:  http://grad.georgetown.edu/academics/grad-ombuds/.  Graduate students can contact the Graduate Student Ombuds at:  gradombuds@georgetown.edu 
  • Sexual Misconduct and  Harassment Policy Statements:

    Georgetown University and its faculty are committed to supporting survivors of sexual misconduct, including relationship violence, sexual harassment and sexual assault.  University policy requires faculty members to report any disclosures about sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator, whose role is to coordinate the University’s response to sexual misconduct.

    Georgetown has a number of fully confidential professional resources who can provide support and assistance to survivors of sexual assault and other forms of sexual misconduct.  These resources include:

    Jen Schweer, MA, LPC
    Associate Director of Health Education Services for Sexual Assault Response and Prevention
    (202) 687-0323
    jls242@georgetown.edu

    Erica Shirley, Trauma Specialist
    Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS)
    (202) 687-6985
    els54@georgetown.edu

    More information about campus resources and reporting sexual misconduct can be found at http://sexualassault.georgetown.edu.


6. Linguistics Labs

The Linguistics Department has three laboratory facilities. These are:

• The Linguistics Lab (housed in ICC 201)
• The Data Acquisition Lab (housed in ICC 233)
• The Observation Classroom (housed in ICC 204a)

These laboratory facilities provide students and faculty with access to specialized hardware and software for linguistic research, equipment for recording, transcribing, digitizing, and analyzing audio data, equipment for recording and editing digital videos and stills, and facilities (including a sound-attenuated booth) for conducting experiments and interviews. Some equipment (including tape recorders, microphones, and digital cameras) may be checked out for use in fieldwork via an on-line request form. For details on the facilities and equipment available, please visit the website: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/linglab

PART IV: THE FACULTY

Jeff Connor-Linton, Ph.D., University of Southern California 
Associate Professor
Concentration affiliation:  Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Language testing, cross-cultural communication
Office: Poulton 249    Phone: 687-6156
Contact

 

Ralph Fasold, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Professor Emeritus
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Variation in syntax, African American Language syntax, Language policy
Contact

Cynthia Gordon, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Associate Professor
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Discourse analysis, family and health communication, language and digital media, intertextuality
Office: Poulton 252     Phone: 687-6210
Contact

Heidi E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Professor    
Concentration affiliation:  Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Discourse analysis, intertextuality, institutional discourse, health discourse, language and Alzheimer’s disease
Office: Poulton 255     Phone: 687-0979
Contact              website

Patrick Jones, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Assistant Teaching Professor
Concentration affiliation: Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Phonology, morphology, phonetics, tone, opacity, Bantu, Optimality Theory
Office:  Poulton 221    
Contact               webpage

Ann Kennedy, Ph.D., George Mason University
Adjunct Lecturer
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Language learning and teaching, literacy assessments, motivation, women's educational opportunities in international settings, grammar instruction, open source instructional materials
Contact

Ruth Kramer, Ph.D., University of California at Santa Cruz
Associate Professor
Concentration affiliation: Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Syntax, morphology, Amharic, Ancient Egyptian, gender, number, agreement, clitics, Distributed Morphology, minimalism
Office: Poulton 254     Phone: 687-5753
Contact               website

Donna Lardiere, Ph.D., Boston University
Professor
Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Linguistics
Concentration affiliation: Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Second language aquisition, first language acquisition, morphosyntax
Office: Poulton 251      Phone: 687-5529    
Contact

David Lightfoot, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Professor and Director, CCT Program
Co-Director, Interdisciplinary PhD-level Concentration in Cognitive Science
Concentration affiliation: Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Syntactic variation, diachronic change, childhood acquisition, role of linguistics in the brain and cognitive sciences
Office: CarBarn 311  Phone: 687-4804
Contact

Sue Lorenson, M.A., Georgetown University
Senior Associate Dean, Georgetown College
Research interests: Phonology, language processing, linguistics and reading, language and the brain
Office: White Gravenor 108     Phone: 687-5750
Contact

Alison Mackey, Ph.D., University of Sydney 
Professor 
Vice-Chair, Department of Linguistics
Director, Applied Linguistics
Concentration affiliation:  Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Second language acquisition, research methodology
Office: Poulton 247     
Contact              website

Margaret Malone, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Teaching Professor
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Language assessment, assessment literacy, study abroad, program evaluation 
Office: Poulton 227     Phone: 687-0988
Contact              

Corey Miller, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Adjunct Lecturer
Concentration affiliation: Computational Linguistics
Research interests: Phonetics, phonology, sociolinguistics, dialectology, speech synthesis (text-to-speech), speech recognition, Persian, French, Spanish, German, Hebrew
Office: Poulton 220

Jennifer Nycz, Ph.D., New York University
Assistant Professor 
Concentration affiliations: Sociolinguistics and Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Phonological variation, sociolinguistics, (socio)phonetics, phonological theory, dialect contact, change over the lifespan, vowel systems, accommodation & style-shifting, individual differences in language variation, research methods in phonetics 
Office: Poulton 224    
Contact               website

Anastasia Nylund, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Assistant Teaching Professor
Concentration affiliations: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Language variation, style, discourse analysis, mixed methods research
Office: Poulton 239     Phone: 687-6139
Contact              website

Lourdes Ortega, Ph.D., University of Hawaii
Professor
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Second language acquisition, research methodology, L2 writing, foreign language education, bilingualism
Office: Poulton 250
Contact               website

Luke Plonsky, Ph.D., Michigan State University
Assistant Professor
Concentration affiliations: Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Second language acquisition, second language pedagogy, quantitative research methods, meta-analysis, methodological literacy
Office: Poulton 246     Phone: 687-0974
Contact               website

Paul H. Portner, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts (Amherst)
Professor 
Director, Theoretical Linguistics Concentration, Spring 2015
Concentration affiliations: Theoretical Linguistics and Computational Linguistics
Research interests: Semantics, pragmatics, syntax/semantics interface 
Office: Poulton 241     Phone: 687-5949
Contact               website

Natalie Schilling, Ph.D., University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill)
Associate Professor 
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: language variation, sociolinguistic field methods
Office: Poulton 225     Phone: 687-6211
Contact

Nathan Schneider, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University
Assistant Professor
Concentration affiliation: Computational Linguistics
Research interests: Computational linguistics/natural language processing; lexical semantics; form-meaning interface; adpositions and case; cognitive linguistics; corpus annotation; machine learning; English, Hebrew, Arabic
Office: Poulton 226     Phone: 687-0975
Contact              website

Jennifer Sclafani, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Associate Teaching Professor
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Discourse analysis, language and gender, political discourse, cross-cultural communication
Office: Poulton 223
Contact

Shaligram Shukla, Ph.D., Cornell University
Associate Professor
Concentration affiliation: Theoretical Linguistics
Research interests: Historical and Indo-European linguistics
Office: Poulton 221    Phone: 687-6212
Contact

Nicholas Subtirelu, Ph.D., Georgia State University
Assistant Teaching Professor
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics
Office: Poulton 257     Phone: 687-0967
Contact:              website:

Deborah Tannen, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 
University Professor
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests: Discourse Analysis, Conversational Interaction, Language & Gender, Social Media Discourse 
Office: Poulton 256     Phone: 687-5910
Contact               website

Amelia Tseng, Ph.D., Georgetown University
Adjunct Lecturer
Concentration affiliation: Sociolinguistics
Research interests:  Sociolinguistics; sociophonetics; discourse analysis; bilingualism; language and identity; ethnicity; migration and diasporic communities; language contact practices
Office: Poulton 220
Contact               website

Andrea Tyler, Ph.D., University of Iowa
Professor 
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics
Research interests: Cognitive Linguistics, Applied Cognitive Linguistics, discourse analysis and cross-cultural communication, language and the law
Office: Poulton 254     Phone: 687-5755
Contact               website

Emma Violand-Sanchez, Ph.D., The George Washington University
Adjunct Lecturer
Concentration affiliation: Applied Linguistics

George Wilson, Ph.D., Brandeis University
Adjunct Lecturer
Concentration affiliation: Computational Linguistics
Research interests: Computational Linguistics, Text Mining, Information Extraction, Machine Translation, Information Retrieval
Office: Poulton 220
Contact

Amir Zeldes, DPhil, Humboldt University of Berlin
Assistant Professor
Director, Computational Linguistics, Fall 2016
Concentration affiliation: Computational Linguistics
Research Interests: Corpus linguistics, syntax-semantics interface, usage-based grammar, productivity, multifactorial methods, corpus-based historical linguistics, natural language processing, digital humanities
Office: Poulton 257   Phone: 687-6760
Contact               website

Elizabeth C. Zsiga, Ph.D., Yale University
Professor
Chair, Department of Linguistics 
Concentration affiliations: Theoretical Linguistics and Computational Linguistics
Research interests:  Phonology and phonetics
Office: Poulton 226     Phone: 687-6908
Contact 
 

PART V: PLAN OF STUDY FORMS

To download plan of study forms visit the internal website forms page: https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/gulinguists/students/forms